The Pollinators of Summer

There are about 200,000 species of animals that pollinate plants. Most of these are insects, but some are birds and small mammals. Here are some of the pollinators we’ve seen hard at work in the local area.

Butterflies and moths

©Rob Klug
©Miki Jourdan
©Angela N.
©Rob Klug
©Miki Jourdan
©Rob Klug
©Rob Klug
©Victoria Pickering
©Miki Jourdan
©Angela N.
©Victoria Pickering
©Miki Jourdan

Bugs

Bees aren’t the only insect pollinators – there are a number of bugs, such as beetles and flies, that are important pollinators.

©Miki Jourdan
©Angela N.
©Miki Jourdan
©Miki Jourdan
This may look like a bee, but it’s actually a traverse banded flower fly. ©MIki Jourdan

Bees

©Victoria Pickering
©Angela N.
©Rob Klug
©Rob Klug
©Angela N.
©Victoria Pickering
©Angela N.
©Angela N.
©Miki Jourdan
©Victoria Pickering
©Victoria Pickering
©Rob Klug
©Rob Klug

Birds

Many birds are pollinators. The hummingbird, with its long beak, is an especially effective pollinator.

©Miki Jourdan
©Rob Klug
©Miki Jourdan
©Miki Jourdan
©Rob Klug

If you want to find out more about local pollinators, the Smithsonian has a Pollinator Garden next to the Museum of National History.

To see a lot of butterflies from around the world, the Museum of National History has a ticketed indoor butterfly exhibit.

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